The content of this site is protected by Copyscape. Please do not use any of the site's content without the express permission of the author. For more information, click on the banner below.

Protected by Copyscape Online Plagiarism Software

Learning How To Deal With a Snoring Partner

Snoring can sometimes be a nuisance, but other times, a snoring partner can get to be such a huge problem that it can even drive loving couples apart.



Right now you may feel like your snoring partner is only a minor annoyance and not a big deal, or you may already be nearing the breaking point. Either way, you are probably sick of listening to your partner’s chainsaw snoring night after night, week after week. 

You also probably feel constantly tired and fatigued due to the bad sleep your partner’s snoring is causing you to have. If this is the case, it’s time to look for some help before your partner’s snoring drives a wedge between the two of you.

What Can You Do About a Partner Who Snores?

If you have a partner that snores, the first option should always try to persuade them to go to the doctor to try and determine the cause of their snoring, as it could be caused by a potentially dangerous sleeping disorder. This is especially true if you notice that you partner stops breathing for short periods of time while sleeping along with loud or intense snoring, as this is a sign of a serious sleep disorder known as sleep apnea. 

 

We say that the first option should be to try and help eliminate or at least reduce your partner’s snoring because snoring is quite bad: not only for the health of the snorer, but the poor quality of sleep that it gives you can also be quite damaging as well. 

 

If your partner won’t consent to going to the doctor, then there are plenty of other over the counter methods you can try to help with your snoring partner problem. In fact, many of these anti snoring devices and supplements are actually what your doctor would recommend if they find that your partner isn’t suffering from a sleep disorder. Still, it’s best always to check with a doctor before, just to make sure.

snoring partnerThese anti snoring devices come in a wide variety of different products, all intended to lessen or completely cure snoring problems. Nonetheless, not all of them live up to the claims that they make, while others work wonders for some while doing nothing for another. 

One of the devices that most people are probably familiar with are nasal strips, which go across the bridge of the nose to gently open up the nasal passages. 

This is probably the least intrusive way to at least reduce the snoring before it drives you mad, and most people are easily able to persuade their partner to wear them as they quickly stop noticing they even have it on.

If your partner doesn’t like wearing the nasal strips, then you can probably forget about getting them to use many of the other anti-snoring devices as most are even more uncomfortable to sleep with than the strips. Still, you could try buying a special snoring pillow to help. 

These pillows are especially useful if your partner snores mainly when sleeping on their back. That’s because they are designed to cradle the head in such a way as to make it uncomfortable to sleep on the back, so they just might take care of most of your problem. 

If none of these tricks work, you can also get your partner to try herbal supplements or tea to make them sleep more soundly which could also help. There are also nasal sprays to clear up the nasal passages, and throat sprays to numb and tighten the soft palate tissue and uvula, both of which are hit or miss. Some have great success with these products, while others quickly demand a refund.

snoring partnerAnother tip is to try and gently persuade your spouse that they shouldn’t drink alcohol for at least a few hours before going to bed, as it relaxes the muscles in the mouth and throat, causing further airway obstruction and louder snoring. The combination of drinking and snoring also severely degrades the overall quality of sleep.

If your partner is overweight, you might try to get everyone to go on a diet, or to exercise a bit more. Being overweight is one of the main causes, and if you have an overweight partner who snores, losing weight should definitely help reduce it.

What To Do When All Else Fails

So you feel like you have tried everything possible, and yet you still suffer nightly sleeping next to a partner who snores. So what’s next? Some people eventually find that their snoring partner gets so annoying and the noise so incessant that they simply can’t stand to sleep next to it, and wind up sleeping in separate rooms night after night. This is of course the worst case scenario, and most people would do almost anything to avoid it, but often feel there are no other options. 

snoring partnerWell, luckily there is another option, provided that you're willing to make a compromise. Snoring earplugs are a time tested snoring treatment. If you are willing to wear ear plugs at night, you will soon find that you can finally bear to sleep next to your spouse. While earplugs will not eliminate all of the noise if your partner’s snoring is exceptionally loud, but they can still lower the volume from that of a jackhammer to that of a gentle, quite conversation. 

When looking for earplugs, make sure you choose ones that fit your ears well, but most importantly, are made of a material that will be comfortable enough and secure enough to wear all through the night. After all, you don’t want to be sleeping peacefully and suddenly be startled awake by your snoring partner when your earplug falls out. 

Another important thing to look for is the earplug’s NRR or noise reduction rating. This number stands for the amount of decibels that the plug will block out. You can find good, cheap earplugs online or try looking in your local hardware store.

No matter what you and your partner decide to do, it is important to take at least some form of action to ensure that your snoring partner doesn’t tear your good night's rest apart.


Leave us Your Comments!



Back to Snoring Problems

Back to the Snoring Home Page